My Thoughts on Pussy Gate

I’ve got a fun little post on Second Life sex coming up this week (hopefully by tomorrow morning). Meanwhile, I thought I’d share my quick thoughts on Pussy Gate. First, I agree with a recent post by Blake Eskin that we should stop worrying so much about profanity in news media. I don’t give a shit that Trump said the word “pussy.” What I mind is Trump’s “joke” about women letting him grope them publicly because he’s a celebrity. After kidding along with Trump, Billy Bush then awkwardly pressures a woman (who doesn’t know what they’ve been discussing) to give Trump a hug. It’s pretty sleazy.

So many people, including women, have defended Trump’s “locker room talk.” Some people have said they’ve heard far worse from men in their lives. So, let’s imagine a gentleman’s version of Trump’s remarks, something you might find in a 19th-century romance novel or a Restoration comedy:

I do believe my fame has granted me certain liberties among the ladies. For instance, I find they do not protest when I gently kiss upon their necks, even when we are yet barely acquainted. Further, they but gasp coyly and avert their eyes should my hand find its way under their petticoats. Hardly do they stir when I explore their most private regions with my fingers. That, my good sir, is the reach–you might say–of my charm. Now, who shouldn’t aspire to acquire such power?

That’s exactly how a rake talks, and that kind of language should sound just as misplaced today as Trump’s more vulgar version. Both statements express a sense of entitlement. They convey the attitude that success comes with the right to fondle women in public, along with the ridiculous fantasy that we actually like it. Hey, maybe a few women do. That’s their choice. But to say “all women” let celebrities grope them is misogynistic.

The skin of Trump’s humor isn’t the point. If Trump were just one more slob, it wouldn’t matter so much. What matters is that he’s running for the highest elected office in our nation. What he says, and how we acts, should reflect our greatest expectations, not the lowest common denominator.

As for Trump’s excuses that Clinton has behaved “far worse,” let’s cut the bullshit. If Clinton has sexually assaulted women, then he should be investigated. But Trump has been a complete hypocrite on this issue. How many photographs do we have of Trump all buddy-buddy with the Clintons? How many audio clips do we have of Trump praising them? Bill Clinton’s history has been public knowledge for quite some time, since the 90s. It never bothered Trump until the past couple of weeks.

Only now, when Trump has to defend himself, does he start pointing fingers at someone he believes to be a rapist. He’s not criticizing Clinton because he cares about rape culture. To my knowledge, Trump has remained silent on the hundred other examples of rapists getting off with little to no jail time. He’s talking about rape now in order to get himself off the hook. That’s not the kind of president I want.

The article below by Blake Eskin, an editor and writer, shows statistics on expletive avoidance by the New York Times. I think his larger point is that our culture should get over its prudish anxiety toward bad words and focus on the meaning behind them:

Source: Watershed Moments: Donald Trump, Rakeyia Scott, and the Times – Strong Language

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